To build with package managers, with pre-compiled binaries, or from source... that is the question

I remember how excited I was when Mac OS X was initially released. Finally I had real development tools available on my platform of choice. I could run a web server with middleware to develop database-driven web sites on my laptop. The only problem was that although having Unix file management skills, at the time, I had absolutley no experience compiling the required Unix software from source.

Filed under

Released this week: Eclipse PDT 1.0 and YUI 2.3.1

The PHP Developer Tools Project reached a major milestone this week with the version 1.0 release of PDT. I had recently installed the all-in-one Europa/PDT release and received errors when attempting to update via the Update Manager—something about being unable to unzip a package. Today, however, everything seems fine and when I reviewed Help -> Software Updates -> Manage Configuration -> PDT Feature, it showed version 1.0 as installed.

Filed under

A feast for thought

In years past we've been fortunate to have had Jeffrey Veen, Molly Holzchlag, Jeff Zeldman, Eric Meyer, Carrie Bickner, Vincent Flanders, and Bebo White among many others discuss how to's and the big ideas that spark great disucussions and new goals.... In Doug's place we had a free-form moderated panel that included David Sklar, Bebo White, Michael Angeles, and Allan Marcus.

Install Apache 2 and PHP 5 with MacPorts

PHP logo

4/2/08 - Added php.ini settings to use the proper MySQL socket at /tmp/mysql.sock.

3/23/08 - After going through these instructions on a new Leopard system, I made a few minor updates. The steps should now work for Leopard as well as Tiger.

While options abound, MacPorts may be the easiest option to configure a local web development environment on your Mac. I'll mention a few of the other options and then share the steps I've used to install Apache 2 and PHP 5 with MacPorts.

Getting Started with Eclipse PHP Development Tools (PDT)

Eclipse Splash ScreenAre you ready to take a step beyond writing code in a text editor like UltraEdit, BBEdit, or TextMate? Would you like to see those PHP and JavaScript syntax errors in the editor, without transferring files to the server or opening a browser? If so, then you're ready to jump into the world of the IDE — Integrated Development Environment. I'll compare the free, open source Eclipse IDE to a few of its commercial competitors Then we'll go through the steps to install Eclipse PDT All-In-One, the Zend Debugger, JSEclipse, and Subclipse.

Filed under